Does the Existence of Steroid Addiction Alter the View That Steroid Use in Sport is Cheating?

Does the Existence of Steroid Addiction Alter the View That Steroid Use in Sport is Cheating? / Ken Kirkwood. - (Quest 66 (2014) 4 (14 October); p. 485-494)

  • DOI: 10.1080/00336297.2014.950758


Abstract:

It is widely accepted that doping in sports is, by definition, cheating. If we allow that cheating is advantage-seeking behavior utilized by one party in an agreement-defined activity that disallows that behavior, then taking drugs when others do not is cheating. The focus of this definition is on the intentions and purpose of the actor, which is primarily about advantage seeking. This article will argue that the effect of anabolic steroid addiction on the volition of the actor caeteris paribus invalidates the adequacy of cheating to describe this behavior.

Original document

Parameters

Science
Dissertation
Date
14 October 2014
People
Kirkwood, Ken
Country
Canada
Language
English
Other organisations
University of Western Ontario (UWO)
Doping classes
S1. Anabolic Agents
Medical terms
Addiction / dependence
Document category
Scientific article
Document type
Pdf file
Date generated
21 July 2020
Date of last modification
5 August 2020
Category
  • Legal Source
  • Education
  • Science
  • Statistics
  • History
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  • Country
  • Language
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  • ADRV
  • Legal Terms
  • Sport/IFs
  • Other organisations
  • Laboratories
  • Analytical aspects
  • Doping classes
  • Substances
  • Medical terms
  • Various
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Origin