Pancreatic Islet Hyperplasia : A Potential Marker for Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use

Pancreatic Islet Hyperplasia : A Potential Marker for Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use / Jared Weinand, Walter L. Kemp. - (Academic Forensic Pathology 8 (2018) 3 (31 August); p. 777-785).
- PMID: 31240072.
- PMCID: PMC6490586.
- DOI: 10.1177/1925362118797755
_________________________________________________

Abstract

It has been estimated that up to four million Americans have used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) to increase muscle mass - either for improved athletic performance, enhanced personal appearance, or both. While the pathologic effects of supra-physiologic doses of AAS have been well-described for some organ systems, such as the cardiovascular system, the effects on other organ systems are less well-described; for example, there is a dearth of knowledge in the medical literature regarding the effects of recreational use of AAS on the islet cells of the endocrine pancreas. As pancreatic islet hyperplasia has previously been described in the literature in a group of patients receiving long-term AAS treatment for Fanconi anemia, it is reasonable to suggest that the use of AAS by bodybuilders could produce the same (or similar) histologic changes. We present a case that offers support for the association of anabolic-androgenic steroid use and pancreatic islet hyperplasia.

show »
Type:
pdf

Parameters:

Science
Case report
Date:
1 September 2018
People
Kemp, Walter L.
Weinand, Jared
Country
United States of America
Language
English
Legal Terms
Athlete deceased
Other organisations
University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences
Doping classes
S1. Anabolic Agents
Medical terms
Health effects
Document category
Scientific article
Document type
Pdf file
Category
  • Legal
  • Education
  • Science
  • Statistics
  • History
Country & language
  • Country
  • Language
Other filters
  • ADRV
  • Legal Terms
  • Sport/IFs
  • Other organisations
  • Laboratories
  • Analytical aspects
  • Doping classes
  • Substances
  • Medical terms
  • Various
  • Version
  • Document category
  • Document type
Publication period
Origin