World Athletics 2019 WA vs Gomathi Marimuthu

26 May 2020

In June 2019 the India National Anti-Doping Agency (INADA) reported multiple anti-doping rule violations against the Athlete Gomathi Marimuthu after her A and B samples, provided during four competitions in March and April 2019, tested positive for the prohibited substance 19-norandrosterone (Nandrolone).

After notification a provisional suspension was ordered and Results Management was referred to the World Athletics Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU). The Athlete filed a statement in her defence and she was heard for the World Athletics Disciplinary Tribunal.

In this case there were delays in the proceedings attributed to the Athlete and her team. There were repeated requests to postpone the hearing due to the COVID-19 restrictions in India, there were technical troubles for holding a video conference and the Tribunal received repeatedly incomplete evidence from the Athlete’s team.

The Athlete denied the intentional use of the substance and provided several explanations for the presence of Nandrolone in her samples: genetic conditions, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) which she suffers and physical activity. Also supported by an expert witness the Athlete asserted that there had been several departures from the ISTI and ISL regarding the chain of custody and the storage of the samples.

The AIU requested the Panel to impose a sanction of 4 years since the Athlete failed to demonstrate that te violation was not intentional nor how the substance entered her system. The AIU contended that none of the alleged departures from the ISTI and ISL could have caused the positive test results, her explanations were not plausible and her alleged medical conditions were not confirmed by any medical evidence.

The Panel reviewed in detail the Athlete’s assertions regarding the alleged departures from the ISTI and ISL and is comfortably satisfied that the Athlete failed to explain how exactly the alleged departures in sample collection, handling and anlysis could potentially influence the outcome of the laboratory analysis.

The Panel holds that Athlete failed to produce evidence that she suffers from PCOS nor demonstrated with evidence how this syndrome or her physical activity could have effected the 19-norandrosterone level in her system.

The Panel deems that the presence of the prohibited substance had been established in the Athlete’s samples and accordingly that she committed 4 violation to be considered as one single anti-doping rule violation.

Therefore the World Athletics Disciplinary Tribunal decides on 26 May 2020 to impose a 4 year period of ineligibility on the Athlete starting on the date of the provisional suspension, i.e. on 17 May 2019.

WADA - COVID-19: ADO Guidance for Remote Education Programs

5 Jun 2020

COVID-19: ADO Guidance for Remote Education Programs / World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). - Montreal : WADA, 2020


The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published an Anti-Doping Organization (ADO) Guidance for Remote Education Programs in light of COVID-19, which the Agency developed in consultation with its Education Committee. This document is the latest in a series of such Guidance documents that WADA has issued for ADOs outlining how they can best protect the health of athletes while protecting their right to doping-free sport. It aims to support ADOs in carrying out remote anti-doping education programs for athletes, Athlete Support Personnel (ASP) and other stakeholders during COVID-19.

The Guidance document highlights the many techniques that can be implemented to deliver education within an anti-doping community impacted by social distancing. Distance learning techniques such as eLearning can enable people to undertake remote education, on their own and at a time that is convenient to them. Use of information technologies and other digital communication tools can help sustain an athlete’s interest and make the learning process more engaging. These techniques and others should be considered by ADOs so that this time can be used positively to educate athletes and those around them.

With this, WADA encourages ADOs to adapt their education programs under these pandemic circumstances in order to keep protecting and promoting Clean Sport. The Agency recognizes that the use and access to technology differs per audience and country around the globe; and therefore, has proposed some alternative ideas within the Guidance to help overcome these limitations.

WADA will continue to liaise with ADOs and athletes in the interest of publishing updates regarding the Agency’s response to COVID-19 as the situation evolves

McLaren Independent Weightlifting Investigation

4 Jun 2020

McLaren Independent Weightlifting Investigation : Independent Investigator Report to the Oversight and Integrity Commission of International Weightlifiting Federation / Richard H. McLaren; McLaren Independent Investigation Team (MIIT). - Toronto : McLaren Global Sport Solutions, 2020


On 5 January 2020 the German television network, ARD aired the program “Der Herr de Heber” (The Lord of the Lifters), a documentary film by Hajo Seppelt, Nick Butler and Gritt Hartmann (the ARD Documentary). The documentary claimed the leadership of the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF), including President Tamás Aján (Dr. Aján) participated in or had knowledge of numerous irregularities occurring within the IWF. The allegations related to corruption, financial irregularities, property investment, doping control testing and sample manipulation combined with doping fine payment irregularities. There were also suggestions of favouritism and the deliberate undermining of certain Member Federations accomplished through cronyism and nepotism.

This Report contains the outcomes, background and detailed findings of the investigation conducted by the McLaren Independent Investigation Team (MIIT) under the direction of and by the Independent Investigator Richard H. McLaren appointed by the IWF’s Executive Board and the Acting President, through the Oversight and Integrity Commission (O&I Commission).

Key Findings of the Report:

1.) Dr. Aján’s autocratic authoritarian leadership of the International Weightlifting Federation resulted in a dysfunctional, ineffective oversight of the organisation by the Executive Board, which had an ill-informed understanding of the organisation. This was achieved through various control mechanisms. As a consequence, Dr. Aján disabled anyone other than himself from understanding the overall affairs of the IWF.

2.) The foundational control mechanism used by Dr. Aján was the tyranny of cash. Cash collected, cash withdrawn, and cash unaccounted for, which Dr. Aján was the sole collector. The primary sources of this cash were doping fines paid personally to the President and cash withdrawals of large amounts from the IWF’s accounts, usually withdrawn before major competitions or IWF congresses. It is absolutely impossible to determine how much of the cash collected or withdrawn was used for legitimate expenses. The McLaren Independent Investigation Team has determined that $10.4 million USD is unaccounted for.

3.) Weightlifting has a history of use of performance enhancing drugs. Over 600 lifters in the past decade have tested positive. While Dr. Aján has impermissibly interfered with the IWF Anti-Doping Commission, the real problem is the culture of doping that exists in the sport. The investigation uncovered 40 positive Adverse Analytical Findings hidden in the IWF records. This includes gold and silver medalists who have not had their samples dealt with. This information has been passed on to WADA for further investigation.

4.) HUNADO is not the cause of doping sample manipulation or hidden results. It has operated in compliance with WADA standards. The investigation found that the procedures followed by Doping Control Officer Barbara Kallo were correct and in accordance with the WADA Code. The source of antidoping issues that have plagued the IWF and sport of weightlifting lie elsewhere. HUNADO and its DCOs are not the cause of the positive testing results or the alleged influence on weightlifters to be tested.

5.) The financial records are a jumble of incomplete and inaccurate figures distorted by a failure to accurately record cash expenditures and revenues and disclose hidden bank accounts by Dr. Aján.

6.) The two most recent Electoral Congresses were rampant with vote buying for the President and senior level positions of the Executive Board, despite monitoring. Such actions are a fundamental violation of the sport’s By-Laws on Disciplinary and Ethics Procedures.


Contents:

Chapter 1: Executive Summary of this Report
A. IMMEDIATE ACTION
B. OVERALL RECOMMENDATIONS
- i. Constitutional Reform
- ii. Electoral Reform
- iii. Financial Reform
- iv. Governance Reform
- v. Anti-doping Control Reform
Chapter 2: The Dr. Aján Presidency
2.1 Constitutional Structure & Hierarchy of IWF
2.2 A Half-Century of Unfettered Autonomous Control
2.3 Presidential Coercion
- i. Cash Control
- ii. Redundant Treasurer
- iii. Exclusive Financial Control
- iv. EB Approval Without Questions
- v. Cash for votes: Rigging Electoral Congresses
- vi. The Presidentially Anointed Executive Board
- vii. The IWF’s Secretariat
- viii. Cash from Doping Fines
2.4 Infiltration of the Anti-Doping Control Program
2.5 Conclusion
Chapter 3: The Hijacking of Financial Control
Chapter 4: Electoral Corruption - Cash for Votes
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Preparations for the Electoral Congress
4.3 How a Presidency is Bought
4.4 Conclusion
Chapter 5: Anti-Doping Over the Decades
5.1 Introduction
5.2 The 1980s & 1990s
5.3 Weightlifting Scandals Morphed into the Twenty-first Century
5.4 A Dirty Decade in the Twenty-first Century
5.5 Legal Structure and Operation of the Anti-Doping Commission
5.6 Presidential Meddling in Antidoping
5.6.1 Test Distribution Plans
5.6.2 Interference in Results Management
- i. Delay of Results Management: A Case Study of Azeri Lifters .
- ii. Missing Positives Results
5.7 Doping Fines
5.8 Role of HUNADO
- i. HUNADO at Houston World Championships 2015
- ii. Suspicious Out-of-Competition Test Results prior to Houston
5.7 Conclusion

DIS 2015 NADA vs Benedikt K.

22 Aug 2016

In March 2015 the National Anti Doping Agency of Germany has reported an anti-doping rule violation against the Athlete Benedikt K. after his A and B samples tested positive for the prohibited substance Darbepoetin (dEPO) in a low concentration. After notification a provisional suspension was ordered.

The Athlete filed a statement in his defence and he was heard for the Tribunal of the German Institution of Arbitration (DIS). At the Athlete’s request the Athlete’s sample was also analysed in the accredited LSI Lab using the mass spectrometry method.

The Athlete did not dispute the validity of the SAR-PAGE Method used in the Cologne Lab but claimed, supported by an expert witness, that the analysis of his samples had resulted in a false positive related to the immunity therapy treatment he underwent. He argued that mass spectrometry analysis in the LSI Lab showed not the presence of the substance dEPO in his sample.

NADA contended that the test results of the Athlete’s A and B samples were valid and analysed in the Cologne Lab in accordance with the applicable WADA-Standards demonstrating the presence of the prohibited substance dEPO. NADA asserted that there was not a false positive in this case because the used mass spectrometry method in the LSI Lab could not detect the presence of dEPO in such a low concentration while the Cologne Lab could detect dEPO in a lower concentration by using the SAR-Page-Method.

The Tribunal finds that the test results were valid and analysed in the accredited Cologne Lab in accordance with the ISL Standard. As a result the Tribunal concludes that the presence of the prohibited substance dEPO had been established in the Athlete’s samples and accordingly that he had committed an anti-doping rule violation.

The Tribunal agrees that the used mass spectrometry method in the LSI Lab was not able to detect dEPO in such a low concentration compared to the SAR-PAGE Methode used in the Cologne Lab while the concentration dEPO found was validly just above the Limit of Detection. Further the Tribunal deems that the Athlete failed to demonstrate that his immunity therapy treatment could have caused the alleged false positive test result.

Therefore the DIS Tribunal decides on 22 August 2016 to impose a 4 year period of ineligibility on the Athlete starting on the date of the provisional suspension, i.e. on 17 March 2015.

DIS 2015 NADA vs Michail R.

22 Feb 2016

In March 2015 the National Anti Doping Agency of Germany has reported an anti-doping rule violation against the powerlifter Michail R. after his sample tested positive for the prohibited substance
Methandienone. Previously in 2007 a fine and a 1 year sanction was imposed on the Athlete for testing positive for Methandienone related to a contaminated supplement he had used.
After notification a provisional suspension was ordered and the case was settled by the Tribunal of the German Institution of Arbitration (DIS) based on the written submissions of the parties.

In his submissions the Athlete gave a prompt admission, accepted the test result and denied the intentional use of the substance. He explained that he had used the substance as self treatment for his elbow injuries and the product was provided to him by a ‘person’. He requested the Tribunal to consider his 2007 violation not as a first anti-doping rule violation since the positive test was the result of a contaminated supplement.

NADA contended that the violation was intentional because the Athlete was already sanctioned in 2007 for the use of Methandienone, he now again tested positive for the same substance while he could have known since 2007 that Methandienone was a prohibited substance. Further the Athlete failed to seek legitimate medical treatment for his elbow injuries nor had used legitimate prescribed medication.

The Tribunal finds that the presence of a prohibited substance had been established in the Athlete’s sample and accordingly that he committed an anti-doping rule violation. It holds that the Athlete acted with significant fault because he could have known that he had used a prohibited substance provided by an unidentified person. Furthmore it establish that there are no grounds for a reduced sanction for the Athlete's second anti-doping rule violation.

Therefore the DIS Tribunal decides on 22 February 2016 to impose a fine and an 8 year period of ineligibility on the Athlete starting on the date of the sample collection i.e. on 7 March 2015.

DIS 2015 NADA vs Marco L.

14 Jul 2015

The National Anti Doping Agency of Germany has reported an anti-doping rule violation against the boxer Marco L. after his A and B samples tested positive for Cannabis in a concentration above the WADA threshold (190 ng/ml). The case was settled by the Tribunal of the German Institution of Arbitration (DIS) based on the written submissions of the parties.

The Athlete admitted the violation and denied the intentional use of the substance. He explained that he had used Cannabis on New Year's Eve and also two days before the Doping Control after shift work to help him sleep. NADA concludes that the violation was not intentional, establishes No Significant Fault or Negligence in this case and the Athlete accepts the proposed warning.

Therefore the DIS Tribunal decides on 14 July 2015 to impose a warning on the Athlete.

DIS 2015 NADA vs Christoph P.

4 May 2015

In December 2014 the National Anti Doping Agency of Germany has reported an anti-doping rule violation against the cyclist Christoph P. for his refusal to submit to sample collection.
The case was settled by the Tribunal of the German Institution of Arbitration (DIS) based on the written submissions of the parties.

Here the Doping Control Officer (DCO) reported that during the competition in question the Athlete after notification refused to provide a sample and he confirmed this by signing the Athlete Refusal Form while he failed to give a reason for his refusal.

Considering the evidence and the applicable Rules in this case the Tribunal concludes that the Athlete after notification had refused to provide a sample and accordingly that he committed an anti-doping rule violation without a compelling justification since he failed to provide any reason for his refusal.

Therefore the DIS Tribunal decides on 4 May 2015 to impose a 2 year period of ineligibility on the Athlete starting on the date of decision.

FIVB 2019 FIVB vs Rodriguez Perez

15 Jan 2020

In July 2019 the International Volleyball Federation (FIVB) has reported an anti-doping rule violation against the Puerto Rican player Rodriguez Perez after his A and B samples tested positive for multiple prohibited substances: 19-norandrosterone (Nandrolone), Boldenone, Methandienone and Methyltestosterone. After notification a provisional suspension was ordered. The Athlete failed to attend the hearing of the FIVB Disciplinary Panel nor did he file a statement in his defence.

The Disciplinary Panel finds that presence of prohibited substances had been established in the the Athlete's samples and accordingly that he committed an anti-doping rule violation. The Panel concludes that the Athlete failed to demonstrate the the violation was not intentional nor how the substances entered his system.

Therefore the FIVB Disciplinary Panel decides on 15 January 2020 to impose a 4 year period of ineligibility on the Athlete starting on the date of the provisional suspension, i.e. on 26 July 2019.

FIVB 2018 FIVB vs Erika Isabel Asencio Soriano

4 Feb 2019

In October 2018 the International Volleyball Federation (FIVB) has reported an anti-doping rule violation against the Dominican player Erika Isabel Asencio Soriano (18) after her A and B samples tested positive for the prohibited substance Trenbolone. After notification a provisional suspension was ordered. The Athlete filed a statement in her defence and she was heard for the FIVB Disciplinary Panel.

The Athlete denied the intentional use of the substance and asserted that the positive test was the result of contaminated meat that she and her team had consumed in a hotel-restaurant at the International Airport of Mexico City. In support the Athlete produced evidence of her travel to and stay in Mexico and information about the restaurant in question.

The Panel established that all the players of the Athlete’s team ate from the same restaurant and that one other player was tested. That player tested negative whereas the Athlete tested positive and she had received some anti-doping education. The coaches were aware of meat contamination in Mexico but believed that the meat would be safe at the airport since they believed there were stricter regulations at the airport than elsewhere in Mexico.

Furthermore the Panel establishes that there were several discrepancies between the Athlete’s statement and the filed evidence from publicly available sources which the Athlete and her Federation were unable to explain. The coaches ignored the warnings about the consumption of meat in Mexico while the meat used in the barbecue rib sandwiches in question was pork, not beef as asserted by the Athlete. As a result the Panel finds that the Athlete failed to demonstrate that the violation was not intentional nor showed that the presence of Trenbolon was caused by contamined meat.

The Panel notes that the imposed sanction is harsh given the Athlete’s age and inexperience and that she may be have been let down by her national federation.
Therefore the FIVB Disciplinary Panel decides on 4 February 2019 to impose a 4 year period of ineligibility on the Athlete starting on the date of the provisional suspension, i.e. on 1 October 2018.

Molecular Effects of Supraphysiological Doses of Doping Agents on Health

10 Mar 2015

Molecular Effects of Supraphysiological Doses of Doping Agents on Health / Esther Imperlini, Annamaria Mancini, Andreina Alfieri, Domenico Martone, Marianna Caterino, Stefania Orrù, Pasqualina Buono. - (Molecular BioSystems 11 (2015) 6 (June); p. 1494-1506).
- PMID: 25787095.
- DOI: 10.1039/c5mb00030k


Abstract

Performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) gained wide popularity not only among sportsmen but also among specific subsets of population, such as adolescents. Apart from their claimed effects on athletic performance, they are very appealing due to the body shaping effect exerted on fat mass and fat-free mass. Besides the "underestimated" massive misuse of PEDs, the short- as well as long-term consequences of such habits remain largely unrecognized. They have been strictly associated with serious adverse effects, but molecular mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Here, we analyze the current understanding of the molecular effects of supraphysiological doses of doping agents in healthy biological systems, at genomic and proteomic levels, in order to define the molecular sensors of organ/tissue impairment, determined by their misuse. The focus is put on the anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), specifically testosterone (T) and its most potent derivative dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and on the peptide hormones, specifically the growth hormone (GH) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A map of molecular targets is defined and the risk incidence for human health is taken into account.

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